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Summers Can't Have Brown Eyes and Other Color Analysis Myths Summers Can't Have Brown Eyes and Other Color Analysis Myths

Posted on by Valora Abbett

Myth #1:

Summers Cannot Have Brown Eyes

What the what?! This has got to be the most ridiculous thing I have ever heard in my life. Summers can and do have brown eyes. The truth is you can find any eye color in any season. The thing is that they will vary in intensity, clarity, and undertone depending on the persons seasonal color type. Summer brown eyes are soft and are usually cool in tone. They are a soft cool brown ranging from light to dark and some contain soft reddish tones giving them a rosewood-like appearance. 

A famous brown-eyed Summer is Julia Stiles. Julia has deep brown eyes, warm beige skin and medium ash blonde hair. She is a "Summer" with softer more muted coloring putting her in the Late Summer color category.

Julia Stiles Brown Eyed Summer

Myth #2:

Cool Seasons Have Cool Skin and Warm Seasons Have Warm Skin

Why The Vein Test is Wrong

 

This may sound crazy, but it is actually the other way around. Colors that are warm and cool complement and balance each other. This is why people that fit into a warm home-base season such as Spring or Autumn actually have cool skin tones that are balanced by warmer hair and eyes.

Summers and Winters have warm yellow-based skin tones that are balanced by cool hair and eyes. They may "look cool" when wearing their correct cool toned clothing colors and makeup, but this is simply because their natural coloring is in harmony with and is being balanced out by the cool tones they are wearing. To learn more about undertones and how to spot them, please check out my page on Understanding Your Skin Tone.

Myth #3:

You Can Be Any Season

Wrong Colors

Yes and no. Everyone has a main season, but their coloring can contain or also be influenced by other seasons or characteristics. If it were really true that you can be any season, hence wear any clothing, hair, or makeup colors you want then the woman in the above photo should in theory look fantastic. While she is naturally beautiful, her hair, the colored contact lenses she is wearing, her makeup, and the background color are all out of harmony with her true natural coloring.

Her home-base season is "Winter" yet they are trying to make her fit into warm season by adding warm highlights into her hair, lightening and warming up her eyes with hazel colored contact lenses, and applying a light coral lipstick. The golden yellow background isn't enhancing either. She just looks blurred out overall. Her natural contrast and intensity is no longer there.

Each person has their own chroma and value, which you can read more about this on the Color Analysis page. But, they also have a main overall seasonal color type. I have yet to find someone who is 100% neutral.

Myth #4:

A Single Characteristic Determines Your Seasonal Color Type

Some color systems believe that only your hair color determines your color type or only your eye color. I believe skin tone is the most important indicator, but it is not the only one. Hair and eye color are both factors as well. The colors in all three characteristics harmonize with each other and are what makeup your coloring. You cannot discount or ignore any of them. 

Can You Be More Than One Season?

Our coloring isn't always as typical as we think it should be. Our true undertones, saturation level, and contrast level isn't always obvious. This is why it is important to compare and why a trained color consultant checks their clients coloring against many different colors ranging from very cool to very warm, light to dark, bright to soft, etc. 

Myth #5 -

Color Analysis is Old and Outdated

Vintage Color Analysis

Color analysis dates back to the dawn of the commercial beauty industry in the 1920's. It was widely used by fashion and costume designers, which is why the classic Hollywood beauties such as Rita Hayworth, Marilyn Monroe, and many others always looked so amazing. Watch "Singin' in the Rain" from 1952 and you will notice that Gene Kelly and Donald O'Connor are both dressed in their correct colors in each scene. Costume designer Walter Plunkett and his team of stylists knew what they were doing.

It wasn't until the 1970's that color analysis, especially at-home analysis, became popular and hit the mainstream thanks to Carole Jackson's book 'Color Me Beautiful' and The Suzanne Caygill Method as well. If you are interested in historical beauty and Fashion then I highly recommend that you checkout Glamour Daze. They have an amazing site and have collected all sorts of historically accurate beauty guides from the 1920's through the 1970's. 

The older color analysis systems did focus mainly on hair color, which is outdated and limiting. However, they did agree that everyone has some warm color and some cool colors that look good on them. Some current systems are overcomplicated and also limiting in some ways. In my color system, I use the classic 4-season color types but I also account for the seasonal influences.

This is what makes my system different and up-to-date. Color is relative and not as rigid as some believe. If you really want to understand color analysis and color theory then I highly recommend you read the book Color Analysis Pure and Simple by Irenee Riter.

I hope the above has answered some of your questions and cleared up any confusions you may have had about color analysis. 

 

Image Sources:
Pinterest and Google

Myth #1:

Summers Cannot Have Brown Eyes

What the what?! This has got to be the most ridiculous thing I have ever heard in my life. Summers can and do have brown eyes. The truth is you can find any eye color in any season. The thing is that they will vary in intensity, clarity, and undertone depending on the persons seasonal color type. Summer brown eyes are soft and are usually cool in tone. They are a soft cool brown ranging from light to dark and some contain soft reddish tones giving them a rosewood-like appearance. 

A famous brown-eyed Summer is Julia Stiles. Julia has deep brown eyes, warm beige skin and medium ash blonde hair. She is a "Summer" with softer more muted coloring putting her in the Late Summer color category.

Julia Stiles Brown Eyed Summer

Myth #2:

Cool Seasons Have Cool Skin and Warm Seasons Have Warm Skin

Why The Vein Test is Wrong

 

This may sound crazy, but it is actually the other way around. Colors that are warm and cool complement and balance each other. This is why people that fit into a warm home-base season such as Spring or Autumn actually have cool skin tones that are balanced by warmer hair and eyes.

Summers and Winters have warm yellow-based skin tones that are balanced by cool hair and eyes. They may "look cool" when wearing their correct cool toned clothing colors and makeup, but this is simply because their natural coloring is in harmony with and is being balanced out by the cool tones they are wearing. To learn more about undertones and how to spot them, please check out my page on Understanding Your Skin Tone.

Myth #3:

You Can Be Any Season

Wrong Colors

Yes and no. Everyone has a main season, but their coloring can contain or also be influenced by other seasons or characteristics. If it were really true that you can be any season, hence wear any clothing, hair, or makeup colors you want then the woman in the above photo should in theory look fantastic. While she is naturally beautiful, her hair, the colored contact lenses she is wearing, her makeup, and the background color are all out of harmony with her true natural coloring.

Her home-base season is "Winter" yet they are trying to make her fit into warm season by adding warm highlights into her hair, lightening and warming up her eyes with hazel colored contact lenses, and applying a light coral lipstick. The golden yellow background isn't enhancing either. She just looks blurred out overall. Her natural contrast and intensity is no longer there.

Each person has their own chroma and value, which you can read more about this on the Color Analysis page. But, they also have a main overall seasonal color type. I have yet to find someone who is 100% neutral.

Myth #4:

A Single Characteristic Determines Your Seasonal Color Type

Some color systems believe that only your hair color determines your color type or only your eye color. I believe skin tone is the most important indicator, but it is not the only one. Hair and eye color are both factors as well. The colors in all three characteristics harmonize with each other and are what makeup your coloring. You cannot discount or ignore any of them. 

Can You Be More Than One Season?

Our coloring isn't always as typical as we think it should be. Our true undertones, saturation level, and contrast level isn't always obvious. This is why it is important to compare and why a trained color consultant checks their clients coloring against many different colors ranging from very cool to very warm, light to dark, bright to soft, etc. 

Myth #5 -

Color Analysis is Old and Outdated

Vintage Color Analysis

Color analysis dates back to the dawn of the commercial beauty industry in the 1920's. It was widely used by fashion and costume designers, which is why the classic Hollywood beauties such as Rita Hayworth, Marilyn Monroe, and many others always looked so amazing. Watch "Singin' in the Rain" from 1952 and you will notice that Gene Kelly and Donald O'Connor are both dressed in their correct colors in each scene. Costume designer Walter Plunkett and his team of stylists knew what they were doing.

It wasn't until the 1970's that color analysis, especially at-home analysis, became popular and hit the mainstream thanks to Carole Jackson's book 'Color Me Beautiful' and The Suzanne Caygill Method as well. If you are interested in historical beauty and Fashion then I highly recommend that you checkout Glamour Daze. They have an amazing site and have collected all sorts of historically accurate beauty guides from the 1920's through the 1970's. 

The older color analysis systems did focus mainly on hair color, which is outdated and limiting. However, they did agree that everyone has some warm color and some cool colors that look good on them. Some current systems are overcomplicated and also limiting in some ways. In my color system, I use the classic 4-season color types but I also account for the seasonal influences.

This is what makes my system different and up-to-date. Color is relative and not as rigid as some believe. If you really want to understand color analysis and color theory then I highly recommend you read the book Color Analysis Pure and Simple by Irenee Riter.

I hope the above has answered some of your questions and cleared up any confusions you may have had about color analysis. 

 

Image Sources:
Pinterest and Google